smack of something

smack of something
smack of (something) to have some of the characteristics or qualities of something.

The book smacks of having been written by a committee rather than an author with a point of view.

Usage notes: often said about a negative characteristic or quality, as in the example

New idioms dictionary. 2014.

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Look at other dictionaries:

  • smack of something — ˈsmack of sth derived to seem to contain or involve a particular unpleasant quality • Her behaviour smacks of hypocrisy. • Today s announcement smacks of a government cover up. Main entry: ↑smackderived …   Useful english dictionary

  • smack of — (something) to have some of the characteristics or qualities of something. The book smacks of having been written by a committee rather than an author with a point of view. Usage notes: often said about a negative characteristic or quality, as in …   New idioms dictionary

  • smack — smack1 [smæk] v [T] [Date: 1400 1500; Origin: Perhaps from Middle Dutch smacken to hit . smack of 1300 1400 From smack taste (11 21 centuries), from Old English smAc] 1.) to hit someone, especially a child, with your open hand in order to punish… …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • smack — smack1 [ smæk ] verb 1. ) transitive to hit someone with your flat hand or a flat object: I don t believe it s right to smack children when they re being naughty. a ) transitive BRITISH INFORMAL to hit someone with your FIST (=closed hand): He… …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • smack of — 1 the tea smacked of tannin: TASTE OF, have the flavour of. 2 the plan smacked of self promotion: SUGGEST, hint at, have overtones of, give the impression of, have the stamp of, seem like; smell of, reek of. → smack * * * ˈsmack of [transitive]… …   Useful english dictionary

  • smack of — phrasal verb [transitive] Word forms smack of : present tense I/you/we/they smack of he/she/it smacks of present participle smacking of past tense smacked of past participle smacked of smack of something to be a sign of something bad Going out… …   English dictionary

  • smack — Ⅰ. smack [1] ► NOUN 1) a sharp blow given with the palm of the hand. 2) a loud, sharp sound made by such a blow. 3) a loud kiss. ► VERB 1) hit with a smack. 2) smash, drive, or put forcefully into or o …   English terms dictionary

  • smack in the face — If something is a smack in the face, it is a shock, usually one that impedes progress …   The small dictionary of idiomes

  • smack your lips — smack (your) lips to show excitement or satisfaction. Planners began smacking their lips at the thought of all that farmland to build on. Etymology: from the sound made when you quickly move your lips together and apart to show you are hungry or… …   New idioms dictionary

  • smack lips — smack (your) lips to show excitement or satisfaction. Planners began smacking their lips at the thought of all that farmland to build on. Etymology: from the sound made when you quickly move your lips together and apart to show you are hungry or… …   New idioms dictionary

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